Abstracts of Medical Reports
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Abstracts of Medical Reports related to Irritable Bowel Syndrome.

Here you will find abstracts from medical reports published in medical and science journals. Sometimes it is difficult to understand everything written but in most cases the abstracts will give you an indication of what the final results were.

Should you wish to read to whole report  the full reference has been included.

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The following are abstracts of reports as published on medical journals. The reports cover Lactose Intolerance topics and other related subjects such as Irritable Bowel Syndrome.

Role of irritable bowel syndrome in subjective lactose intolerance.

Do patients with short-bowel syndrome need a lactose-free diet?

Lactose malabsorption and irritable bowel syndrome. Effect of a long-term lactose-free diet.

 

Role of irritable bowel syndrome in subjective lactose intolerance.
Vesa TH, Seppo LM, Marteau PR, Sahi T, Korpela R; Am J Clin Nutr 1998 Apr 67:4 710-5

Abstract
It has been suggested that the symptoms of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) may be wrongly attributed to lactose intolerance. We examined the relations among IBS, demographic factors, living habits, and lactose intolerance. On the basis of a lactose tolerance test with ethanol, 101 of the 427 healthy subjects studied were lactose maldigesters and 326 were lactose digesters. IBS was diagnosed by means of the Bowel Disease Questionnaire, according to the Rome criteria. The use of dairy products and symptoms experienced after their consumption were recorded. IBS was found in 15% of both the lactose maldigesters and lactose digesters. One-third of the subjects reported intolerance to dairy products containing < or = 20 g lactose. About half of this third were lactose maldigesters and about half were lactose digesters. As explanations for this subjective lactose intolerance, the logistic regression model estimated lactose maldigestion (odds ratio: 10.3; 95% CI: 5.2, 20.4), IBS (4.6; 2.1, 10.1), experience of symptoms other than gastrointestinal ones (2.3; 1.2, 4.5), and female sex (2.1; 1.1, 4.0). Characteristics common to both subjective lactose intolerance and IBS were female sex and the experience of abdominal pain in childhood (P < 0.01). Age, regularity of meals, and the amount of physical activity were not associated with either subjective lactose intolerance or IBS. Of the subjects with IBS, the percentage of lactose maldigesters was the same as in the whole study group (24%) but the number who reported lactose intolerance was higher (60% compared with 27%, P < 0.001). We showed a strong relation among subjective lactose intolerance, IBS, the experience of abdominal pain in childhood, and female sex.

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Do patients with short-bowel syndrome need a lactose-free diet?
Marteau P, Messing B, Arrigoni E, Briet F, Flourié B, Morin MC, Rambaud JC; Nutrition 1997 Jan 13:1 13-6

Abstract
We compared the tolerance of a diet providing 20 g/d lactose and a lactose-free diet in 14 patients with short-bowel syndrome with either the colon in continuity (group A, n = 8) or a terminal jejunostomy (group B, n = 6). Lactose tolerance was studied after a single 20-g lactose load in the fasting state, and during two 3-d periods during which the subjects consumed their usual diet plus either 20 g/d lactose, with no more than 4 g/d as milk, or no lactose. Records and measurements included symptoms, fecal weight, and during the 8 h after the lactose load, breath-hydrogen excretion (group A) or lactose and hexoses flow rates in stomal effluents (group B). Results are expressed as medians with ranges in parentheses. Lactose absorption was 61% (0-90) in group A and 53% (18-84) in group B, and no symptoms of intolerance were noticed. During the lactose-rich diet as compared to the lactose-free diet, no symptoms were noticed nor was there any worsening of diarrhea: 1534 g/d (240-4760) versus 1466 (1590-7030) in group A, and 4122 g/d (1730-6830) versus 3496 (1590-7030) in group B. We conclude that a diet providing 20 g/d lactose with no more than 4 g/d as milk is well tolerated in the majority of patients with short-bowel syndrome, and that a lactose-free diet has usually no benefit in these subjects.

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Lactose malabsorption and irritable bowel syndrome. Effect of a long-term lactose-free diet.
Vernia P, Ricciardi MR, Frandina C, Bilotta T, Frieri G; Ital J Gastroenterol 1995 Apr 27:3 117-21

Abstract
Lactose malabsorption may induce abdominal symptoms indistinguishable from those of the irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), however the exact relationship between the two conditions and the optimal differential diagnostic workup are still to be defined. We prospectively studied the prevalence of lactose malabsorption (by means of a hydrogen breath test) and the clinical effect of a long-term lactose-free diet in 230 consecutive patients with a suggested diagnosis of irritable bowel syndrome, no organic disease of the GI tract, and no history of milk intolerance. Lactose malabsorption was diagnosed in 157 patients (68.2%). In 48 (43.6%) of the 110 patients who complied with the diet symptoms subsided, in 43 they were somewhat reduced and in 17 they remained unchanged. Symptoms never fully subsided in lactose malabsorbers non-compliant with the diet or in normal lactose absorbers who adhered to a lactose-free regimen. Partial improvement was observed in 20% of these subjects. No relation was demonstrated between pre-trial symptoms and the outcome of the diet. The occurrence of symptoms during the lactose breath test strongly suggested a favorable response to diet, but did not help in predicting whether symptoms would subside or be reduced. Conversely, their absence during the test was not associated with an acceptable negative predictive value. The high prevalence of lactose malabsorption in the patients under study suggests that in Italy IBS and lactose malabsorption are frequently associated. A test for diagnosing lactose malabsorption should always be included in the diagnostic workup for IBS and a long-term lactose-free regimen recommended if the test is positive.

 

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